Customising Gedit for tcl scripting

I spent a whole evening trying to find out some IDE or editor that would help me in coding tcl scripts as a part of ns simulations. The major feature I expected was autocompletion and keyword highlighter. Every editor/IDE that I stumbled upon contained one or the other, but not all. I tried Komodo Edit, Visual TCL,Alpha(tk) etc. Some of these even tested my patience in installing them.

Frustrated, I took recourse to Gedit and by chance I noticed that there are certain plugins available for Gedit, which I found would help satisfy my requirements I had mentioned in the para above. One notable plugin is the “Autocompletion” plugin. While you type the code/some word, this plugin shows a popup of words which were used before in the same document. In simple, it “autosuggests”. This one was interesting.

Along with this, you can enable some more plugins like “Bracket Completion”,”Embedded Terminal” and “Session saver”, whose purpose is pretty much self explained. And thus you almost have an IDE customised to code tcl or almost any language, needless to say that gedit provides better code highlights.

This is where you find the plugins….

Gedit–>Edit–>Preferences–>Plugins

For more on installing gedit plugins in Ubuntu, see my previous post.

<Here> is a complete list of Gedit plugins and don’t miss out the Latex plugin 🙂


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~TiP~

Move Window Buttons Back to the Right in Ubuntu 10.04 / 10.10

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Embedded Terminal in Gedit

Gedit is one of the finest editors available for Linux.

I have been using it for quite sometime and has always wished that it contained an embedded terminal similar to the one in Kate. Little did I realise that it is available in default Gedit installations, until I stumbled upon a blog post on that topic. All you need to do is to enable the Terminal  plugin in  Gedit Preferences. Still there was a catch. Ubuntu did not list “Embed Terminal” option in its plugin list. Searching for a while in Google gave me the following solution.

Install the missing plugin options …

$ sudo apt-get install gedit-plugins

Thats all!

Now you can find “Embed Terminal” option in

Gedit—> Edit—>Preferences–>Plugins.

Check your choice, then enable display of bottom pane(View–> Bottom Pane or just ctrl+f9).

Bingo!! There you see the terminal now. Now you can write code and compile it easily!

More interesting tips <here>

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